Easiest Way to Prepare Speedy Japanese Hito-kuchi Katsu (mini deep fried pork cutlets)

Japanese Hito-kuchi Katsu (mini deep fried pork cutlets)
Japanese Hito-kuchi Katsu (mini deep fried pork cutlets)

Hello everybody, it is Brad, welcome to our recipe site. Today, I will show you a way to prepare a special dish, japanese hito-kuchi katsu (mini deep fried pork cutlets). It is one of my favorites. For mine, I’m gonna make it a bit unique. This will be really delicious.

Great recipe for Japanese Hito-kuchi Katsu (mini deep fried pork cutlets). Pork katsu, a staple Japanese dish, is a deep-fried pork cutlet on top of rice that is traditionally served with simple shredded cabbage.

To begin with this recipe, we must prepare a few ingredients. You can have japanese hito-kuchi katsu (mini deep fried pork cutlets) using 6 ingredients and 10 steps. Here is how you can achieve it.

The ingredients needed to make Japanese Hito-kuchi Katsu (mini deep fried pork cutlets)-
  1. Take 1 lb pork tenderloin
  2. Prepare 8 tablespoon all purpose flour
  3. Get 1 large egg
  4. Make ready 10 tablespoon panko (buy “panko” not “bread crumbles”)
  5. Take Salt and Pepper for taste
  6. Get Olive oil for frying
Instructions to make Japanese Hito-kuchi Katsu (mini deep fried pork cutlets)-
  1. Slice the tenderloin diagonally, each piece should be a inch thick, palm size (or smaller).
  2. Pound the meat with a meat mallet to make the thickness even
  3. Salt and pepper very lightly on the both sides of the meat then coat each piece with flour. (I do step 1-3 on the same cutting board)
  4. Beat the egg in a bowl - add 1-2 tablespoon water and mix it well, in a large plate, spread out panko. Set both aside
  5. Work one piece at a time. Dip the meat in the egg mix first, flip to coat both sides, move it to the panko plate and press the panko on the both sides - place it on a clean plate and move on to the next piece
  6. Heat the oil in a large deep skillet (you don’t need a lot of oil, 1-2 inch would be enough). Drop a piece of panko and if it touches the bottom of your pan for 1 sec and float with small bubbles, the oil is at the right temperature!
  7. When the oil is hot, put the meat in the oil - don’t over crowd the pan and don’t touch them until it starts moving around by itself in the pan
  8. When the meat start moving around and floating in the oil, you can flip it. Cook the other side until both sides become golden brown (3-4 mins each side)
  9. Rest the fried pieces on the paper towel lined rack while cooking the rest of the pieces so that you can get rid of excess oil
  10. Serve with Okonomi sauce! (which you can find online on rakuten)

These changes are easy to accomplish with all kinds of foods and can apply to the oils you cook in and the spread you use on bread. Olive oil, for example, contain monounsaturated fats which are basically good fats that battle the effects of bad cholesterol. It is also a great source of Vitamin E which has many benefits and is also good for your skin. While you may already consume lots of fruits and leafy greens, you might want to consider how fresh they are. Organic foods are a great choice and will reduce any possible exposure to toxic chemicals. If you can locate a good local supplier of fresh fruit and veggies, you can also consume foods that have not lost their nutrients because of storage or not being harvested at the right time. As you can see, it is not difficult to begin making healthy eating a part of your daily lifestyle.

Here is how you cook that. Great recipe for Japanese Hito-kuchi Katsu (mini deep fried pork cutlets). Here is how you cook that. Pork katsu, a staple Japanese dish, is a deep-fried pork cutlet on top of rice that is traditionally served with simple shredded cabbage. This dish gets its name from the Japanese word tonkatsu (which means pork cutlet). Preparing pork katsu is a simple three-step process. Dip the pork cutlets first in seasoned flour, then in beaten egg, then in panko breadcrumbs. The breaded cutlets are fried in canola oil or another light oil until brown and crispy. I usually fry pork katsu using my T-fal self-cleaning deep fryer, one of my absolute favorite kitchen gadgets. Ubiquitous in Japanese mini-marts, and picking up steam elsewhere, katsu sandos (cutlet sandwiches) consist of a deep-fried protein—most often pork, but sometimes chicken, beef, or shrimp. Typically there's also shredded cabbage and a sweet-tangy tonkatsu sauce, sometimes called bulldog sauce. Japanese tonkatsu (豚カツ, lit. "pork cutlet") consists of a flattened pork loin, lightly seasoned, coated in flour, dipped in beaten egg, coated with panko crumbs and deep fried. Tonkatsu is often served as an accompaniment to ramen or udon or featured with curry and rice. Heat half the vegetable oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Transfer to plate lined with paper towels. Repeat with remaining vegetable oil and pork cutlets. Deep fry the chicken; never crowd the pot! A bowl of rice is topped with tonkatsu (deep fried crumbed pork cutlet), onion and beaten egg cooked in dashi with sweet soy sauce. The name "katsu-don" (カツ丼) came from two words, "tonkatsu" (トンカツ, deep fried crumbed pork cutlet) and "donburi" (丼, large bowl). Like other beloved Japanese dishes such as curry and tempura, the history of tonkatsu is well charted.

So that’s going to wrap it up with this exceptional food japanese hito-kuchi katsu (mini deep fried pork cutlets) recipe. Thanks so much for reading. I am sure that you will make this at home. There is gonna be more interesting food at home recipes coming up. Don’t forget to save this page on your browser, and share it to your family, colleague and friends. Thank you for reading. Go on get cooking!

close